CI, Who Owns Your Data, Mac keybinds on Linux (and Windows), A Word About Testing, Spring with GraalVM.

The Tao of Continuous Integration

Some good things here (CI needs a purpose), some not great (developers creating workarounds the CI? How?) and no solution for those problems but, in the end, some real things you need to keep an eye for.

For Whom Does Data Work?

Hey, it's "let's get scared about who is getting my data" o'clock!

Ok, not that much but, once again, someone is asking who is getting some money using information we don't know is being captured and processed about us. There is even a discussion about different models -- but sadly leaves things like GDPR and LGPD (the Brazilian version of GDPR) out of it.

Kinto.sh

A script to update your shortcuts to use the same as the Mac. This would be my dream of using Super-C and Super-V instead of Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V -- which doesn't work as expected in the terminal, and you have to add Shift to the equation -- but alas, it doesn't work properly on Fedora due SELinux (and heck if I'm going to lower or disable SELinux -- my paranoid self would never allow that).

A short piece on writing tests

A really short piece about testing, but I surely can agree with the content of the first line: "If you're unsure of how to proceed, white a test".

Announcing Spring Native Beta!

I had my time with Spring and that's one piece of software that made my life with Java less miserable. The title was a bit misleading to me, 'cause I kinda associated the word "Native" with "Mobile, but in one single language".

The "Native" part here is actually targeting the result into a GraalVM image instead of the war tested bytecode.

It's weird how GraalVM appeared and then disappeared from my radar. It was touted as a solution for most integration systems and then... nothing. Maybe with Spring embracing it, it would get some traction again.